Commit 1dc02c07 authored by Michael Witrant's avatar Michael Witrant

finition extraction

parent 8e2fbe9d
......@@ -19,9 +19,14 @@ require 'rubygems'
require 'pp'
require 'nokogiri'
require 'unindent'
require 'erb'
sections = data.scan(%r(<Amend>.+?</Amend>)m)
sections.each do |xml|
template = ERB.new File.read('template.erb'), nil, '-'
File.open "result.txt", "w" do |f|
sections.each do |xml|
doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
num, note = doc.css('NumAm').text.split(' ', 2)
......@@ -55,36 +60,13 @@ sections.each do |xml|
amendement_rows << amendement
end
commission_rows, amendement_rows = [commission_rows, amendement_rows].map do |rows|
[commission_rows, amendement_rows].each do |rows|
rows.delete_if { |row| row.nil? or row.empty? }
rows.join("\n")
end
members = doc.css('Members').text
article = doc.css('Article').text
puts <<-TEXT.unindent
== Amendement #{num} ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: #{color};" |
Amendement #{num}
<br/>
#{article}
<br/>
#{members}
<br/>
#{note}
|-
|
#{commission_rows}
||
#{amendement_rows}
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
TEXT
f.puts template.result(binding)
end
end
== Amendement 53 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 53
<br/>
Recital 1
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive)3 provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services. These policy orientations and objectives should refer to the availability and efficient use of spectrum necessary for the establishment and functioning of the internal market. This Decision is without prejudice to existing EU law, in particular Directives 1999/5/EC and Directives 2002/20/EC and 2002/21/EC, as well as Decision No 676/2002/EC. It is also without prejudice to measures taken at national level, in compliance with EU law, to pursue general interest objectives, in particular relating to content regulation and audio-visual policy and to the right of Member States to organise and use their spectrum for public order and public security purposes and defence.
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 march 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive)3 provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 54 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 54
<br/>
Recital 1
<br/>
Sabine Verheyen, Herbert Reul
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive)3 provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services. These policy orientations and objectives should refer to the availability and efficient use of spectrum necessary for the establishment and functioning of the internal market. This Decision is without prejudice to existing EU law, in particular Directives 1999/5/EC and Directives 2002/20/EC and 2002/21/EC, as well as Decision No 676/2002/EC. It is also without prejudice to measures taken at national level, in compliance with EU law, to pursue general interest objectives, in particular relating to content regulation and audio-visual policy and to the right of Member States to organise and use their spectrum for public order and public security purposes and defence.
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive)3 provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 55 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 55
<br/>
Recital 1
<br/>
Petra Kammerevert
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive)3 provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services. These policy orientations and objectives should refer to the availability and efficient use of spectrum necessary for the establishment and functioning of the internal market. This Decision is without prejudice to existing EU law, in particular Directives 1999/5/EC and Directives 2002/20/EC and 2002/21/EC, as well as Decision No 676/2002/EC. It is also without prejudice to measures taken at national level, in compliance with EU law, to pursue general interest objectives, in particular relating to content regulation and audio-visual policy and to the right of Member States to organise and use their spectrum for public order and public security purposes and defence.
|width="50%"|
(1) Article 8a(3) of the Directive 2002/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (Framework Directive) provides that the Commission may submit a legislative proposal to the European Parliament and Council for establishing multiannual radio spectrum policy programmes setting out policy orientations and objectives for the strategic planning and harmonisation of the use of spectrum in accordance with the directives applicable to electronic communications networks and services. These policy orientations and objectives should refer to the availability and efficient use of spectrum necessary for the establishment and functioning of the internal market.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 56 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 56
<br/>
Recital 1 a (new)
<br/>
Lena Kolarska-Bobińska
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
|width="50%"|
(1a) Spectrum is a publicly held good which can not be privately owned but which must be regulated by states in order to facilitate its usage by the means of licensed transmission rights or licence-free usage rights.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 57 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 57
<br/>
Recital 2
<br/>
Petra Kammerevert
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a key resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a public good of major societal, cultural, social and economic value. It is a key resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 58 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 58
<br/>
Recital 2
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a key resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a public good of major societal, cultural, social and economic value. It is a key resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 59 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 59
<br/>
Recital 2
<br/>
Lena Kolarska-Bobińska
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a key resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|width="50%"|
(2) Spectrum is a key public resource for essential sectors and services, including mobile, wireless broadband and satellite communications, television and radio broadcasting, transport, radiolocation, and applications such as alarm, remote controls, hearing aids, microphones, and medical equipment. It supports public services such as security and safety services, including civil protection, and scientific activities, such as meteorology, Earth observation, radio astronomy and space research. Regulatory measures on spectrum therefore have economic, safety, health, public interest, cultural, scientific, social, environmental and technical implications.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 60 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 60
<br/>
Recital 3
<br/>
Jens Rohde, Philippe Lamberts
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation and contributing to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy.
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation and contributing to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. The harmonisation of spectrum use is also essential to ensure the quality of the services provided by electronic communications and to create economies of scale lowering both the cost of deploying wireless networks and the cost of wireless devices for consumers. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 61 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 61
<br/>
Recital 3
<br/>
Paul Rübig
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation and contributing to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy.
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation and contributing to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy. A delay of the necessary reform through current right holders should absolutely be avoided.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 62 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 62
<br/>
Recital 3
<br/>
Ioan Enciu
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation and contributing to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy.
|width="50%"|
(3) The strategic planning and harmonisation of spectrum use at Union level should enhance the single market for wireless electronic communications services and equipment as well as other Union policies requiring spectrum use, thus creating new opportunities for innovation, employment creation and this will simultaneously contribute to economic recovery and social integration across the Union, while at the same time respecting the important social, cultural and economic value of spectrum. To this end, the Union therefore needs a policy programme that covers the internal market in all Union policy areas involving the use of spectrum such as electronic communications, research and development, transport and energy.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 63 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 63
<br/>
Recital 3 a (new)
<br/>
Jens Rohde, Fiona Hall
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
|width="50%"|
(3a) This first programme should promote competition, introduce a pan-European level playing field and lay the foundation for a genuine single digital market; to secure the full potential and consumer benefits of this radio spectrum programme and the single market the programme should be supplemented by upcoming and new proposals that will enable the development of the online economy such as data protection and a European licence system for online content;
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 64 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: green;" |
Amendement 64
<br/>
Recital 4
<br/>
Giles Chichester
<br/>
--
|-
|width="50%"|
(4) This first programme should in particular support the Europe 2020 Strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth given the huge potential of wireless services to promote an information-based economy, develop and assist sectors relying on information and communications technologies and overcome the digital divide. It is also a key action in the Digital Agenda for Europe4 which aims to deliver fast broadband internet in the future network-based knowledge economy, with an ambitious target for universal broadband coverage with speeds of at least 30 Mbps for all Europeans by 2020, thereby achieving the sustainable economic and social benefits of a digital single market. It should also support and promote other Union sectoral policies such as a sustainable environment and economic and social inclusion for all Union citizens. Given the importance of wireless applications for innovation, this programme is also a key initiative in support of Union policies on innovation.
|width="50%"|
(4) This first programme should in particular support the Europe 2020 Strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth given the huge potential of wireless services to promote an information-based economy, develop and assist sectors relying on information and communications technologies and overcome the digital divide. It is also a key action in the Digital Agenda for Europe4 which aims to deliver fast broadband internet in the future network-based knowledge economy, with an ambitious target for universal broadband coverage. Providing the highest possible broadband speeds and capacity, ensuring not less than 30 Mbps for all by 2020 with at least half of European households having broadband access at a speed of at least 100 Mbps, is important for fostering economic growth and global competitiveness, thereby achieving the sustainable economic and social benefits of a digital single market. It should also support and promote other Union sectoral policies such as a sustainable environment and economic and social inclusion for all Union citizens. Given the importance of wireless applications for innovation, this programme is also a key initiative in support of Union policies on innovation. At the same time (Digital) Terrestrial broadcasting remains the largest and most preferred TV distribution platform, both for Commercial and Public Service Free-to-Air TV (circa 60% of European households pick their primary TV signal from terrestrial broadcasting), and in many countries, is complemented by strong pay TV offerings. For this reason the Commission and Member States should take into account the unique technological, economic and societal benefits of terrestrial broadcasting when formulating the RSPP. Terrestrial broadcasting underpins media plurality and is a force for public good. It is currently the main guarantor of universal access to television, at a minimal cost, across Europe. It is universally available to European consumers across the EU and is the consumers' choice. Demand for linear TV is growing and not decreasing. Viewing habits for many European citizens have not changed and the overwhelming majority of viewing remains via linear television. Moreover in recent years, consumers have invested significantly into digital terrestrial TV equipment.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 65 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 65
<br/>
Recital 4
<br/>
Jan Březina, Alajos Mészáros
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(4) This first programme should in particular support the Europe 2020 Strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth given the huge potential of wireless services to promote an information-based economy, develop and assist sectors relying on information and communications technologies and overcome the digital divide. It is also a key action in the Digital Agenda for Europe4 which aims to deliver fast broadband internet in the future network-based knowledge economy, with an ambitious target for universal broadband coverage with speeds of at least 30 Mbps for all Europeans by 2020, thereby achieving the sustainable economic and social benefits of a digital single market. It should also support and promote other Union sectoral policies such as a sustainable environment and economic and social inclusion for all Union citizens. Given the importance of wireless applications for innovation, this programme is also a key initiative in support of Union policies on innovation.
|width="50%"|
(4) This first programme should in particular support the Europe 2020 Strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth given the huge potential of wireless services to promote an information-based economy, develop and assist sectors relying on information and communications technologies and overcome the digital divide. The explosion of in particular audiovisual media services is driving demand for speed and coverage. It is also a key action in the Digital Agenda for Europe which aims to deliver fast broadband internet in the future network-based knowledge economy, with an ambitious target for universal broadband coverage. Providing the highest possible broadband speeds and capacity, ensuring not less than 30 Mbps for all by 2020 with at least half European households having broadband access at a speed of at least 100 Mbps, is important for fostering economic growth and global competitiveness, thereby achieving the sustainable economic and social benefits of a digital single market. It should also support and promote other Union sectoral policies such as a sustainable environment and economic and social inclusion for all Union citizens. Given the importance of wireless applications for innovation, this programme is also a key initiative in support of Union policies on innovation.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 66 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 66
<br/>
Recital 5
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should specify guiding principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. While spectrum management is still largely a national competence, it should be exercised in compliance with existing Union law and allow for action to pursue Union policies.
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should specify guiding principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. Spectrum management is a national competence. It should be carried out in a manner consistent with existing Union law and should allow for action to pursue a Union spectrum policy. Pursuant to Article 8a(1) of the Framework Directive, Member States are required only to cooperate with one another and with the Commission in connection with the strategic planning, coordination and harmonisation of spectrum use.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 67 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 67
<br/>
Recital 5
<br/>
Petra Kammerevert
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should specify guiding principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. While spectrum management is still largely a national competence, it should be exercised in compliance with existing Union law and allow for action to pursue Union policies.
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should specify guiding principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. Spectrum management is a national competence. It should be carried out in a manner consistent with existing Union law and should allow for action to pursue a Union spectrum policy. Pursuant to Article 8a(1) of the Framework Directive, Member States are required only to cooperate with one another and with the Commission in connection with the strategic planning, coordination and harmonisation of spectrum use.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 68 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 68
<br/>
Recital 5
<br/>
Jens Rohde
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should specify guiding principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. While spectrum management is still largely a national competence, it should be exercised in compliance with existing Union law and allow for action to pursue Union policies.
|width="50%"|
(5) The first programme should set the principles and objectives up to 2015 for Member States and Union institutions, and set out specific implementation initiatives. While spectrum management is still largely a national competence, it should be exercised in compliance with existing Union law and allow for action to pursue Union policies.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 69 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 69
<br/>
Recital 6
<br/>
Petra Kammerevert
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(6) The programme should also take into account Decision No 676/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a regulatory framework for radio spectrum policy in the European Community (Radio Spectrum Decision)5 and the technical expertise of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) so that Union policies which rely on spectrum and were agreed by Parliament and Council can be implemented by technical implementing measures, noting that such measures can be taken whenever necessary to implement already existing Union policies.
|width="50%"|
(6) The programme should also take into account Decision No 676/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a regulatory framework for radio spectrum policy in the European Community (Radio Spectrum Decision) and the technical expertise of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT). Union policies which rely on spectrum and were agreed by Parliament and Council can be implemented by technical implementing provisions. Such provisions should be based on the guidelines of and objectives for EU spectrum policy laid down in Article 8a of the Framework Directive.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 70 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 70
<br/>
Recital 6
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(6) The programme should also take into account Decision No 676/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a regulatory framework for radio spectrum policy in the European Community (Radio Spectrum Decision)5 and the technical expertise of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) so that Union policies which rely on spectrum and were agreed by Parliament and Council can be implemented by technical implementing measures, noting that such measures can be taken whenever necessary to implement already existing Union policies.
|width="50%"|
(6) The programme should also take into account Decision No 676/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 March 2002 on a regulatory framework for radio spectrum policy in the European Community (Radio Spectrum Decision) and the technical expertise of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT). Union policies which rely on spectrum and were agreed by Parliament and Council can be implemented by technical implementing provisions. Such provisions should be based on the guidelines of and objectives for EU spectrum policy laid down in Article 8a of the Framework Directive.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 71 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: green;" |
Amendement 71
<br/>
Recital 7
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
--
|-
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum may require the Commission and Member States to put in place mechanisms to facilitate co-existence between new and existing services and devices to the benefit of end-users and consumers. Such measures may include, but are not limited to the establishment of stakeholder dialogues to ensure optimization of end-user experience; setting up compensation mechanisms to cover migration and co-existence costs; and organizing consumer awareness campaigns.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 72 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: IndianRed;" |
Amendement 72
<br/>
Recital 7
<br/>
Catherine Trautmann
<br/>
+?
|-
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal and productive use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by identifying best practices and encouraging information sharing, as well as the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest, and most appropriate in accordance with Article 5 of Directive2002/20/EC.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 73 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: lightgrey;" |
Amendement 73
<br/>
Recital 7
<br/>
Jean-Pierre Audy
<br/>
|-
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
|width="50%"|
(7) Ensuring the optimal and productive use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations, auctions or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by identifying best practices and encouraging information sharing, as well as the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
|-
| colspan="2" |
<!-- Commentaires -->
|}
== Amendement 74 ==
{| border="1" style="border-spacing:0;" cellpadding="3"
|-
! colspan="2" style="background-color: red;" |
Amendement 74
<br/>
Recital 7
<br/>
Lena Kolarska-Bobińska
<br/>
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(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
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(7) Ensuring the optimal use of spectrum as a public good may require innovative authorisation solutions such as collective use of spectrum, general authorisations or infrastructure sharing. The application of such principles in the Union might be facilitated by the definition of certain common or converging conditions for spectrum usage. General authorisations, which are the least onerous authorisation system, are of particular interest where interference does not risk hampering the development of other services.
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== Amendement 75 ==
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Amendement 75
<br/>
Recital 7 a (new)
<br/>
Catherine Trautmann
<br/>
++
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(7a) While technologically still in development, so-called "cognitive technologies" could already be further explored and even implemented through geolocalised information of spectrum usage, which could ideally be mapped in the inventory.
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== Amendement 76 ==
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Amendement 76
<br/>
Recital 7 a (new)
<br/>
Patrizia Toia
<br/>
-
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(7a) In order to guarantee optimum spectrum use, not least as regards production, public auctions should be organised with a view to generating revenue for the public coffers and encouraging fair and transparent spectrum allocation procedures.
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== Amendement 77 ==
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Amendement 77
<br/>
Recital 8
<br/>
Hella Ranner
<br/>
+?
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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== Amendement 78 ==
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Amendement 78
<br/>
Recital 8
<br/>
Petra Kammerevert
<br/>
+
|-
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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== Amendement 79 ==
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Amendement 79
<br/>
Recital 8
<br/>
Hermann Winkler
<br/>
+
|-
|width="50%"|
(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union. In addition, with a view to achieving the objectives of the ‘Digital Agenda for Europe’ part of the proceeds from the auctioning of spectrum rights (‘digital dividend’) should be used to speed up the expansion of broadband coverage.
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== Amendement 80 ==
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Amendement 80
<br/>
Recital 8
<br/>
Lena Kolarska-Bobińska
<br/>
+
|-
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(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights as well as common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum, would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
|width="50%"|
(8) Spectrum rights trading combined with flexible usage conditions should substantially benefit economic growth. Therefore, bands where flexible use has already been introduced by Union law should be immediately made tradable pursuant to the Framework Directive. In addition, common principles for the format and content of such tradable rights, common measures to prevent accumulation of spectrum which may create dominant positions as well as undue failure to use acquired spectrum and common standards for the removal of these licensed rights would facilitate the coordinated introduction by all Member States of these measures and facilitate acquisition of such rights anywhere in the Union.
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== Amendement 81 ==
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Amendement 81
<br/>
Recital 9
<br/>
Paul Rübig
<br/>